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Bachelor of Advanced Science

Faculty:
Faculty of Science and Engineering
Award:
Bachelor of Advanced Science (BAdvSc)
English Language Proficiency:
Academic IELTS of 6.5 overall with minimum 6.0 in each band, or equivalent
Study Mode:
Full-time, Part-time
Attendance Mode:
Internal
Candidature Length:
Full-time: 3 years
Commencement:
North Ryde — Session 1 (25 February 2019)
Volume of Learning:
Equivalent to 3 years
General requirements:
Minimum number of credit points for the degree 72
Of your 72 credit points, complete a maximum of 30 credit points at 100 level
Minimum number of credit points at 200 level or above 42
Minimum number of credit points at 300 level or above 18
Minimum number of credit points designated as Science 42
Completion of a Qualifying Major for the Bachelor of Advanced Science
Completion of a designated PACE unit
Completion of other specific minimum requirements as set out below

In order to graduate students must ensure that they have satisfied all of the general requirements of the award.

Astronomy and Astrophysics

ADAA19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Physics I (3)
 

200 level

Required
3
Advanced Physics II (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Physics III (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
36

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
21
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Biology

ADBI19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Science (Biology) 1 (3)
 
Required
3cp from
 
Quantitative Methods for Science (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (Advanced) (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (3)
 
 
Introductory Statistics (3)
 
3
Statistical Data Analysis (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Science (Biology) 3 (3)
P
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
24
Biology major

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
33
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72
Note:
Units marked with a P are PACE units.

Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences

ADCB19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Chemistry and Biomolecular Science I (3)
 
Required
3cp from
 
Quantitative Methods for Science (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (Advanced) (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (3)
 
 
Introductory Statistics (3)
 
3
Statistical Data Analysis (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Chemistry and Biomolecular Science III (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
33
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Geology

ADGL19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Geoscience I (3)
 
Required
3cp from
 
Quantitative Methods for Science (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (Advanced) (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (3)
 
 
Introductory Statistics (3)
 
3
Statistical Data Analysis (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Geoscience III (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
24
Geology major

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
33
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Geophysics

ADGP19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Geoscience I (3)
 
Required
3cp from
 
Quantitative Methods for Science (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (Advanced) (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (3)
 
 
Introductory Statistics (3)
 
3
Statistical Data Analysis (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Geoscience III (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
24

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
33
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Mathematics

ADMA19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Topics in Mathematics I (3)
 

200 level

Required
3
Advanced Topics in Mathematics II (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Mathematics III Advanced (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
either
or
 
36

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
21
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Palaeobiology

ADPB19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Science (Biology) 1 (3)
 
Required
3cp from
 
Quantitative Methods for Science (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (Advanced) (3)
 
 
Mathematics IA (3)
 
 
Introductory Statistics (3)
 
3
Statistical Data Analysis (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Science (Biology) 3 (3)
P
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
24

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
33
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72
Note:
Units marked with a P are PACE units.

Physics

ADPH19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Physics I (3)
 

200 level

Required
3
Advanced Physics II (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Physics III (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
36
Physics major

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
21
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Software Technology

ADSF19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Enrichment Topics in Computing (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Topics in Computing and Information Systems (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
36

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
24
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

Statistics

ADST19V1

Specific minimum requirements:

Credit points

100 level

Required
3
Advanced Statistics I (3)
 

300 level

Required
3
Advanced Statistics III (3)
 
Required
6cp from
6
300 level units designated as Science

Additional

Required
24

Balance of credit points required:

 
 
36
Electives

TOTAL CREDIT POINTS REQUIRED FOR THIS PROGRAM

72

AQF Level Level 7 Bachelor Degree
CRICOS Code 067843C
Overview and Aims of the Program Astronomy and Astrophysics
In this major we develop a quantitative interpretation of the Universe and the underlying physical processes within it. The quantitative interpretation begins with observational astronomy – the process of measuring the Universe with particular emphasis on detecting electromagnetic radiation throughout its spectrum. In order to understand what this radiation means, the Advanced Science: Astronomy and Astrophysics major includes the study of radiative transfer: the way in which light propagates through and interacts with matter. From both an observational and theoretical perspective, we study the astrophysical processes that govern the formation and evolution of stars, planets and galaxies, including the structure of our own Galaxy. An essential part of developing this understanding is a solid background in physics and mathematics, including topics such as mechanics, electromagnetic radiation and differential equations. This knowledge development is complemented by hands-on laboratory experiments, collection of astronomical imaging and spectroscopic data, and computer-based analysis.

Biology
The Advance Biology Major is for exceptional students and provides face to face weekly tutorials with active research scientists to discuss key contemporary issues in biology. The Advanced Biology Major offers two units in addition to the requirements for the Biology Major. All students undertake at least one internship to gain hands-on research experience in biological science. The Biology Major offers a comprehensive education in a wide range of biological disciplines, spanning molecules to ecosystems and the biosphere, and terrestrial, marine and freshwater biomes. Throughout the major, structure and function are linked with processes that influence organismal evolution and ecology. Model systems range from microbes to fungi, plants and animals. The philosophy is of learning by doing, with a focus on the development of practical and problem-solving skills. Units take advantage of the university’s bushland setting by frequently offering opportunities for field experience. We have a particular focus on Australia’s unique biodiversity and the processes that have given rise to it.
Key features of the major:
• face to face discussions with active researchers
• workplace experience in the form of an internship
• emphasis on research ready graduates.

Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences
Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences encompasses the study of analysing, transforming and manipulating substances and the molecular interpretation of the world around us. The Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences major is based on understanding molecules and how they are formed and interact and how molecules influence the structure and function of biological systems. The major emphasises chemistry at the interface of biology, enabling students to gain theoretical knowledge and practical experience in a range of subject areas. These include analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, molecular biology and genomics. The major is ideal for students with broad interests in the chemical, biochemical and medical sciences.
A major in Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences offers a path into many chemistry and bio-industries including those engaged in chemical analysis, medical research, pharmaceuticals, diagnostics and biotechnology and provides an excellent foundation for postgraduate studies.
Program entry assumes no prior secondary level education in Chemistry.

Geology
The Macquarie University geology major includes the scientific study of the Earth and other planets, the materials of which they are composed, and the processes by which they change. Integration of field geology with laboratory and theoretical studies of Earth materials underpins an understanding in space and time (4D) of mineral and petroleum systems, geodynamics, geochemistry, tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes and their underlying scientific disciplines.

Geophysics
Geophysics is the branch of Earth science concerned with exploring, modelling and analysing the Earth through physical methods. The geophysics major at Macquarie University includes resource exploration, environmental and groundwater geophysics, earth dynamics, and tectonics. The major provides a solid foundation in the essentials of geophysics and geology. Advanced course work in geophysics provides the in-depth knowledge for students to pursue professional careers in the private sector, government or to undertake advanced postgraduate study.

Mathematics
The study of Mathematics at Macquarie features a modern, balanced curriculum, designed to provide a sound foundation for a future career or further study in any of the major branches of Mathematics, drawn together in a way that ensures that each aspect of the curriculum takes full advantage of the insights and perspectives of traditional pure and applied approaches to the study of mathematics.

In addition to this, the Advanced Science award features a specialist advanced unit in each year of study, extending the undergraduate curriculum to allow early access to areas which are at the forefront of current mathematical research, together with the opportunity to engage in their own mentored research experience working closely with faculty members who are internationally recognised as leaders in their field, through the Mathematics Department's Vacation Research Scholarship program.

The Bachelor of Advanced Science - Mathematics award is fully accredited by the Australian Mathematical Society.

Palaeobiology
The main aim of the Palaeobiology Major is to provide students with a “deep time” perspective to the evolution and history of life on Earth. By studying the fossil record, students will learn more about the evolutionary relationships of animals and plants, the timing and correlation of important events in deep time, and explore fundamental questions related to fluctuating ecological and environmental parameters through time.

Coverage includes a broad survey of important invertebrate and vertebrate fossil groups, study of evolutionary processes as revealed by the fossil record, investigation of reef evolution through time (includes a field excursion to the GBR), application of fossils to reconstruct past environments, climates and behaviours, and the various ways that fossils can be used as tools to solve geological and biological problems. The melding of palaeobiology with evolutionary biology, genetics and developmental biology allows students to explore the new discipline of ‘evo-devo’ which seeks to determine the ancestral relationship between organisms and understand how developmental processes evolved.

Physics
Physics is the quantitative study of Nature at all scales, from elementary particles to the large spacetime structure of the Universe. It encompasses both the search for the most fundamental laws of Nature down to the subatomic level, and emergent phenomena in complex systems, such as material or biological systems. Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, and it remains today both an exciting field at the frontier of knowledge and a fundamental underpinning of all science and technology.

An undergraduate degree in advanced science: physics is generally recognised to be good training for a broad range of careers. It not only prepares students for graduate studies in physics and astrophysics, but when combined with appropriate courses in other disciplines it provides excellent preparation for a career, including biophysics, chemistry, engineering, geophysics, industrial research, finance, teaching and education, policy, medicine or law.

Software Technology
The Software Technology specialisation of the Advanced Science degree is suitable for students who wish to pursue a career designing and delivering complex software. The emphasis in all units is on concepts, insights and skills that enable graduates to use current technologies and also evaluate and adapt to new technologies as they emerge. Central to the learning of the conceptual material is extensive practical experience where complex problems are analysed, solutions designed, and software developed, both individually and in groups. Students will undertake a range of core units that introduce the technologies of modern software development and the practices that result in successful software projects. Elective units supplement the core by considering important application areas in software and/or systems or domain-specific technologies.

Designed for gifted and talented students, this elite program has a strong research focus that provides the flexibility of a Bachelor of Science, plus advanced units that are not available to other students. Students will gain theoretical knowledge and practical experience in a range of relevant subject areas.

Statistics
Statistics as a discipline is the development and application of methods for collecting, analysing and interpreting data. It is the science of learning from data, or converting data into knowledge.
Statistics is an essential tool for making informed decisions in all areas of industry, business and government. Aims include:
producing the “best” information from available data by reducing uncertainty in decision-making, and detecting patterns in the data
designing experiment and other data collection methods to help decision-making, by estimating the present situation and/or predicting the future.
This core major has a strong focus on the application of contemporary statistical methods and the use the latest computational techniques. The development of relevant computing skills also forms an integral part of this major.
The Statistics major in Advanced Science is designed for talented students with a passion for analysing data and providing the best possible information. This program will have a focus on statistical applications in both industry and research that are not available to students in the regular Bachelor of Science program. Students will have the opportunity to become engaged in the research networks at Macquarie University and become effective communicators of statistical methodology.
Graduate Capabilities

The Graduate Capabilities Framework articulates the fundamentals that underpin all of Macquarie’s academic programs. It expresses these as follows:

Cognitive capabilities
(K) discipline specific knowledge and skills
(T) critical, analytical and integrative thinking
(P) problem solving and research capability
(I) creative and innovative


Interpersonal or social capabilities
(C) effective communication
(E) engaged and ethical local and global citizens
(A) socially and environmentally active and responsible

Personal capabilities
(J) capable of professional and personal judgement and initiative
(L) commitment to continuous learning

Program Learning Outcomes By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Astronomy and Astrophysics it is anticipated you should be able to:

1. demonstrate knowledge of fundamental physics concepts and principles at an advanced level (K)
2. evaluate the role of theoretical models, numerical and empirical studies in development of physics knowledge (K, T, E)
3. demonstrate a creative approach to problem solving by independently identifying and applying core physical principles and relevant mathematical and computational techniques (k, T, P, I)
4. design an activity or experiment to test a physical hypothesis (I, C)
5. complete independent research projects in the area of astronomy or astrophysics and present outcomes before peers and lecturers (K, P, C, J)
6. use a range of measurement tools and methodologies to collect data (K, T)
7. use a range of data analysis tools to analyse measurements with due regard to uncertainties (K, T, P)
8. communicate physical ideas using appropriate language and conventions (K, C)
9. demonstrate capacity for effective, responsible and safe work practices as an individual or in a team (E, J, A)
10. demonstrate an understanding of the emission properties of gas with different physical conditions (ionized, neutral or molecular), whether permeated by magnetic fields or not, and of solid matter (dust) (K, T)
11. link emission properties of gaseous and dusty environments to our ability to observe them at different electromagnetic wavelengths and with different observational platforms and techniques (K, T)
12. identify the role of key physical conservation laws in the structure and life cycle of stars (K, T)
13. describe the structure and evolution of galaxies (K)
14. manipulate one and two dimensional data sets (including spectra and images) using astronomical packages (K, P)
15. manipulate equations describing physical principles, using mathematical techniques, to provide an analytical description of an astrophysical problem (K, T, P)
16. write custom computer programs to solve astrophysical problems (K, I)
17. exhibit intellectual integrity and practice ethical conduct (E).

By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Biology it is anticipated you should be able to:

KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
1. have a broad working knowledge of key contemporary topics in biology (K)
2. explain the theory of evolution and why it can be regarded as the central unifying concept in biology (K)
3. compare and contrast the form and function of key biological units at sub-cellular to ecosystem scales (K)
4. explain how processes operating at a hierarchy of temporal and spatial scales give rise to the phenotypes of individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems (K)
5. describe key features of the Australian biota and the processes that have given rise to these (K)
6. evaluate historical developments in biology, as well as current and contemporary research directions and challenges (K, T, J, L)

SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES
7. make inferences by drawing on evidence from a range of disciplines and test novel hypotheses using interdisciplinary approaches (K, T, P, I)
8. develop hypotheses to explain biological patterns and processes and design appropriate experiments to test these (K, T, P, I, J)
9. display competence in using key laboratory and/or field methods in a range of disciplines (K, P)
10. acquire, synthesise, and statistically analyse data (K, T, P)
11. identify instances where biology can contribute to public debate, and critically evaluate biology as communicated in the public sphere (T, E, J)
12. clearly and accurately communicate biological problems and solutions to scientists and the public, using written, oral and digital media (C, E, A, J)
13. practice professional ethics in the conduct of biology (E, A)
14. identity and adopt safe work practices in laboratory and field environments (E, A)
15. display skills in leadership, group management, co-operation and teamwork (C, E, A, J).

By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences it is anticipated you should be able to:

1. exhibit broad knowledge of the principles and concepts of the chemical and biomolecular sciences (K, P)
2. be able to apply your knowledge of chemistry and biomolecular sciences to theoretical and practical problems and tasks (K, P)
3. investigate and solve qualitative and quantitative problems in the chemical and biomolecular sciences, both individually and in teams (K, T, P, I, C, E, A, J)
4. formulate hypotheses, proposals and predictions (K, T, P, I, C, E, A, J)
5. design and undertake experiments in a safe and responsible manner (K, T, P, I, C, E, A, J)
6. apply recognised methods and appropriate practical techniques and tools, and be able to adapt these techniques when necessary (K, T, P, I, J, L)
7. demonstrate the ability to engage in structured research by recording and analysing experimental data (A, P)
8. collect, record and critically interpret data and incorporate qualitative and quantitative evidence into scientifically defensible arguments (K, T, P, I, C, J, L)
9. present information with articulate arguments and conclusions, in a variety of modes, to diverse audiences, and for a range of purposes (T, P, I, C, E, A, J, L)
10. express your understanding of the importance of the chemical and biomolecular sciences in the local and global community including its essential role in industrial, technological and medical advances. This includes through creative endeavours involved in acquiring and applying knowledge. (K, T, I, C, E, A, J)
11. effectively communicate key chemical and biomolecular science concepts and scientific results in both written and oral form to a variety of audiences. Be able to effectively present data, and clearly and concisely answer questions (K, T, I, C, E, A, J)
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science – Geology it is anticipated you should be able to:
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
1. identify and understand at an advanced level the key properties of geological materials such as rocks, minerals, sediments, fossils, ores and energy resources (K)
2. identify key geological systems and their physical and chemical expression within the Earth and solar system (K, T, J)
3. describe the nature of interactions between Earth materials and key geological systems, and interpret the record of these interactions both in space and time (K, T, P, I, J)
4. articulate the central role of time and rates of change in geological phenomena and the scalability and universality of this understanding (K, T, I, P)
5. describe the interaction between chemical and physical processes that govern the evolution of the Earth and planets (K, T, I).
SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES
6. have achieved advanced proficiency in field-based geological techniques to describe, interpret and predict geological relationships and models (K, T, P, J)
7. use microscopic and macroscopic techniques to identify rock types, minerals, sediments, fossils and ores in order to interpret their origin and subsequent geological history (K, T, P, I, J)
8. systematically collect, record, evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative geological data in order to construct and validate scientifically-relevant arguments (T, P, I, J, L)
9. research and extract relevant geological information from existing data sets in order to describe and communicate a coherent understanding of Earth system processes (K, T, P, C, J, L)
10. manipulate and interrogate geochemical data, experimental and computational laboratory methods to interpret geological processes (K, T, P, I, C, J).
APPLICATION OF SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
11. co-ordinate and integrate multiple strands of knowledge in order to solve geologic problems by combining literature review with field, laboratory and computational studies (T, P, I, C, L)
12. summarise and effectively communicate scientific understanding. This will include presentation of information, articulating and evaluating arguments and justifying conclusions using a range of mechanisms (oral, written and visual) to diverse audiences for a variety of purposes (C, E, A, J, L)
13. understand the role of resources and geology in society and appreciate the implications of current resource use (K, T, I,C, E, A, J, L)
14. complete independent research projects in the area of geology and present outcomes to peers, research students and academic staff (K, P, C, J)
15. formulate geological hypotheses and use appropriate techniques to test and evaluate these rigorously through experimentation and observation (T, P, I, J, L)
16. demonstrate a capacity for self-directed learning, an ability to work in a team and work towards deadlines (J, L)
17. demonstrate capacity for effective, responsible and safe work practices as an individual or in a team (E, J, A)
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science – Geophysics it is anticipated you should be able to:
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
1. demonstrate knowledge of the physics, mathematics and geology at an advanced level that form the scientific background for geophysical observation and measurement (K, L)
2. demonstrate an understanding of Earth and planetary structure and evolution (K, L)
3. identify the physical processes governing the behaviour of common geophysical methods and planetary systems (K, L)
4. demonstrate competence in acquiring, modelling and interpreting geophysical data (T, P, I, A, J, L)
5. explain and apply geophysical techniques to solve geological, exploration, environmental and tectonic problems (T, P, C, E, A, J, L).
SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES
6. acquire, reduce, model, and interpret geophysical data (T, P, A, J, L)
7. effectively communicate scientific knowledge through written and oral presentations (C, E, A)
8. complete independent research projects in the area of geophysics and present outcomes to peers, research students and academic staff (K, P, C, J)
9. critically and effectively integrate information gathered from a variety of primary and secondary sources (T, P, J, L)
10. make their own field and laboratory observations with a variety of geophysical instruments (K, P, L)
11. demonstrate capacity for effective, responsible and safe work practices as an individual or in a team (E, J, A)
12. apply suitable theoretical concepts and scientific methodology to address geophysical and geological questions (T, P, I, L)
13. employ a range of computational methods, both commercial and freeware, to solve geophysical, geological and environmental problems (K, T, P, L).
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Mathematics it is anticipated you should be able to:
1. demonstrate a well-developed knowledge and sophisticated understanding of the principles, concepts and techniques of a broad range of areas in algebra, analysis and applied mathematics, with significant depth in several areas of current mathematics research (K, C, T)
2. demonstrate a well-developed understanding of the breadth of mathematics, the multidisciplinary role of mathematics and the way it contributes to the development in other fields of study (K, L, J)
3. construct sustained logical, clearly presented and justified mathematical arguments incorporating deductive reasoning (K, T, P, I)
4. formulate and model practical and abstract problems in mathematical terms using a variety of methods drawn from algebra, analysis and applied mathematics (K, P, T)
5. apply mathematical principles, concepts, techniques and technology efficiently to develop novel techniques to solve practical and abstract problems across a range of areas in algebra, analysis and applied mathematics (K, T, P, I)
6. appropriately interpret mathematical information communicated in a wide range of forms (K, T, C, J)
7. present mathematical ideas, information, reasoning and conclusions in forms tailored to the needs of diverse audiences (K, T, I, J, C)
8. identify and appropriately address ethical issues arising in professional mathematical work; demonstrating a high level of awareness of ethical responsibility and professionalism in all aspects of mathematical practice (K, C, E, A, J)
9. work effectively, responsibly and safely in individual and team contexts (C, E, J).
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Palaeobiology it is anticipated you should be able to:
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
1. have a deep understanding of the principles of palaeobiology and how fossils are used to determine the history of life on earth
2. be able to identify the major morphological features of the most important invertebrate and vertebrate phyla in the fossil record
3. be able to describe the various applications fossils have for solving important biological, ecological, environmental and geological problems
4. have a solid grasp of the principles of biostratigraphy, functional morphology, palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, taxonomy and palaeoclimatic interpretation
5. understand the principles and techniques of scientific methodology and communication through group discussion, debate and written assignments. investigate the origins, radiation, biodiversity trends and evolutionary relationships of the dominant invertebrate and vertebrate groups in the fossil record
6. utilise quantitative and qualitative scientific methods and techniques to evaluate a diverse range of multidisciplinary topics including: reef formation and structure, reef zonation, carbonate sedimentology, biodiversity, ecology, taxonomy, taphonomy, symbiosis, recruitment, bioturbation and bioerosion, human impacts on reef systems and global warming
7. outline the evolution and importance of reef formation in the geological record. Especially important here is that students will be able to describe the changes associated with the evolution of reefs through geological time
8. learn how to conduct and interpret cladistic and cluster analyses and interpret phylogenetic data
SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES
9. analyse trends and patterns of fossil data utilizing new software techniques in order to explore applied theory
10. become familiar with the morphological features of key invertebrates and use this knowledge to interpret function, life habits and behaviour
11. utilise data from the Paleobiology Database to analyse and interpret origination, radiation and extinction patterns throughout the Phanerozoic (0-542 Ma)
12. demonstrate ability to utilize empirical data based on fossil material using specific and general software to investigate evolutionary trends and fluctuations
13. understand principles and gain skills in using bioinformatics and databases in evolutionary and phylogenetic research
14. skills and capabilities to interpret and utilse palaeobiological data to investigate a broad range of topics including applied palaeontology, functional morphology, macroevolution, invertebrate palaeontology and evolution, palaeobiogeography, conservation palaeontology, palaeoecology, phylogeny, reef evolution and dynamics, stratigraphic and biostratigraphic principles, taphonomic analyses, taxononomy and cladistics
15. demonstrate ability to find and utilise relevant information contained in the primary scientific literature
16. be able to formulate your own ideas, opinions and conclusions based on data presented in the primary scientific literature.
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Physics it is anticipated you should be able to:
1. demonstrate knowledge of fundamental physics concepts and principles at an advanced level (K)
2. demonstrate knowledge of mathematical concepts and methods at an advanced level (K)
3. evaluate the role of theoretical models, numerical and empirical studies in development of physics knowledge (K, T, J)
4. demonstrate knowledge of statistical principles behind physics (K)
5. demonstrate a creative approach to problem solving by independently identifying and applying core physical principles and relevant mathematical and computational techniques (K, T, P, I)
6. design an activity or experiment to test a physical hypothesis (K, T, P, I)
7. complete independent research projects and present outcomes before peers and lecturers (P, T, I, C)
8. use a range of measurement tools and methodologies to collect data (K, T, P)
9. use a range of data analysis tools to analyse measurements with due regard to uncertainties (K, T, P)
10. critique science-based arguments and communicate physical ideas using appropriate language and conventions (T, P, C)
11. demonstrate capacity for effective, responsible and safe work practices as an individual or in a team (K, E, A, J)
12. exhibit intellectual integrity and practice ethical conduct (E).
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Software Technology it is anticipated you should be able to:
1. use modern software technologies to analyse, design, create and evaluate complex software (K, T, P, I, C)
2. understand and apply concepts and techniques of software development such as algorithm and data structure design, object-oriented practices, low-level systems programming, and database-centred design (K, T, P, I, C)
3. understand and apply the mathematical concepts and techniques that underpin the development of software (K, T, P, C)
4. have a significant breadth of experience in the application of software to solve problems in a variety of domains (K, T, P, I, C)
5. conduct a software-based project applying industry-standard software development methodologies and practices, including as part of a team (K, T, P, I, C , J)
6. understand the ethical issues that arise in software development and apply standard
approaches for reasoning about ethical issues that arise in the software development profession
(K, T, P, E, J)
7. develop individual experience in scoping a significant research project (K, T, P, I, C, J)
8. develop research management skills which will be dependent upon the particular research area chosen, but students will manage a small research project and see it through to completion (K, T, P, I, C, J).
By the end of the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Statistics it is anticipated you should be able to:
KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
1. demonstrate higher level knowledge and deep understanding of the principles of statistics (K)
2. apply statistical principles, concepts, techniques and technology to solve a range of practical and theoretical problems and interpret the results, with significant depth in several areas of current statistical research (K, T, P)
3. identify situations in which standard techniques do not apply and independently research alternative techniques and solve problems (K, T, P, L)
4. demonstrate a well-developed understanding of the multi-disciplinary role of statistics by applying statistical methods to other fields of study (I, E, J, L).
SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES
5. ask appropriate questions to identify a problem and model it using sophisticated statistical principles (T, P, I, C, J)
6. communicate information, reasoning and conclusion(s) at an appropriate statistical level to a wide range of audience both verbally and in writing (K, T, P, C, E, J)
7. critically reflect on the strength and weaknesses of yourself and your team members and suggest ways in which you and others could improve the work in the future (K, T, P, C, J, L)
8. work co-operatively as a team member (C, E, A, J)
9. make ethical decisions while collecting and analysing data and reporting findings; evaluating the complex ethical aspects and implications of professional statistical work (K, C, E, A, J).
Learning and Teaching Methods Astronomy and Astrophysics
In this program you will build your fundamental technical skills in experimental and theoretical physics and astronomy and develop understanding of their methodology, relationship with other disciplines and technological applications. Most of the units are comprised of three structured learning activities: lectures, tutorials and guided laboratory exercises.

Lectures are where theoretical ideas and experimental and mathematical techniques are introduced and illustrated by a range of illustrative examples. They provide opportunities for discussion and active engagement, and as your studies progress will draw not only on textbooks and online learning materials, but involve exposure and interaction with the current research.

Tutorials both demonstrate concrete applications of techniques introduced in lectures, and provide training ground for students for their application. Tutorials typically involve a mixture of individual and group work with guidance and assistance from the tutors.

Laboratory work is an indispensable part of physics and astronomy education. You will acquire familiarity with experimental methods and practices that both illustrate the theoretical concepts that are presented in lectures and facilitate development of practical research skills. Laboratory work is the first setting where students will learn to work collaboratively, and preparation of reports from practical exercises provides you with valuable training in communicating scientific results.

Mastering effective communication is a major component of all learning activities. Apart from the laboratory reports and problem-solving assignments you will prepare oral and written presentations and/or essays of their research and study projects.

From the first year you will be engaged in collaborative work, both in tutorials and laboratories. With your study progression you become exposed to less structured activities, such as individual or group-based research projects, and formal and informal presentations. There are many instances of blended learning activities, including combinations of online and face-to-face modes, or group and/or one-to-one activities.

The program prescribes People, Planet units and allows for Professional engagement, such as a PACE unit. During your study you will take one of the designated People units (in the areas of social sciences, business or arts) and one Planet unit (experiencing a different area of science).

Toward the end of the program the Capstone unit of study allows you to integrate your skills and knowledge, applied to real-life problems through a research project conducted at an external partner institution.

An annual careers evening is held where graduates of the program return to share their experiences with current students preparing to go out into industry, academic or government employment.

Biology
Advanced Science (Biology) requires students to undertake a standard Biology degree and two additional units (Biol 188 and 388). The learning and teaching methods of these two units are specifically designed to encourage critical thinking while addressing a broad range of hot topics in biology. The small group size and direct contact with active researchers from a broad range of disciplines during weekly tutorials ensures the students are constantly confronted with cutting edge research and novel ideas. Because of the broad experiences, students are effectively trained to think across disciplines.

There is an additional emphasis on creating research-ready students since all students must undertake at least one internship in an active scientific laboratory. The choice of internship location is entirely driven by the individual interests of students and there are examples of students working in labs and in the field all over the world. Biol 388 is a listed PACE unit so students enrolled in this subject also gain active support from the PACE office when organising their internships. To qualify the students must be able to demonstrate that the internship will provide them with scientific training but also provide a benefit to the host institution.
There is an emphasis on science communication which is exemplified through the weekly discussions, through lab placements and ultimately when they present both written and oral reports. The units are only available internally because of the emphasis on face to face contact with researchers during tutorials. These methods are in addition to those in the general biology degree (below).

The Biology Major is taught using approaches that integrate the teaching and research environments. Our units: (1) provide students with an authentic research experience; (2) utilise problem-based learning activities; and (3) embed cutting-edge research in the curriculum.

Most units combine theoretical and practical aspects, building competency in both discipline specific skills and knowledge, and in graduate capabilities, such as problem-solving and communication skills. At first year level, students are introduced to the scientific method. At second year level, students design and test their own simple scientific research questions under staff guidance. At third year level, students are given opportunities to develop and test more complex research questions.

Theoretical elements may be taught using a combination of lectures, tutorials, workshops and online activities. Practical components may involve laboratory-based sessions, field trips to locations at and around campus, the Sydney Basin, and further afield, as well as role-play scenarios and problem-solving in tutorial sessions. In recognition that students learn via different means (i.e. visual, auditory, tactile), many of our units take advantage of a diversity of media for their delivery (e.g. videos, lectures, readings, activities). Our philosophy is that students learn by doing and we endeavour to make our units as hands-on as possible.

The Biology Major is offered in external as well as internal mode. This means that for many units, instead of attending weekly practicals, students can opt to cover these in block over several weekends. Furthermore, many of the theoretical aspects can be completed on-line in lieu of lecture attendance. NOTE: the external offering is designed to maximize flexibility, but does not eliminate the face-to-face component.

Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences
In this program you will be given the opportunity to gain theoretical knowledge and practical experience in the Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences through a variety of independent and collaborative activities. For the majority of units within this program, lectures will be used to introduce the concepts of Chemical and Biomolecular sciences. Laboratory sessions are used to both complement the lecture material and provide practice in common techniques used in research. Tutorials (and dry lab workshops) are additionally designed to reinforce the concepts presented in lectures and practiced in the laboratory but in a smaller peer learning environment. Formal peer assisted learning (PAL) is also offered in some units.
The first year of the program builds your foundation of knowledge in the chemical sciences and how it relates to biomolecular systems. In the second year, you will further develop your Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences knowledge through the core disciplines of analysis and measurement with options in the biochemistry, molecular biology and microbiology and synthesis fields where you will receive broad practical skills training in these areas.
Towards the conclusion of your program, you will explore your chosen disciplinary areas within Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences by choosing from three specialisations (minimum) within the program. A central and dominant theme throughout your program is the inclusion of research experience in the majority of units.
Your program will culminate in the Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences capstone unit where you will integrate your knowledge to define a problem, formulate a hypothesis, and design and plan your own scientific investigation. In addition to developing skills to evaluate and critique the present scientific literature, the laboratory research experience forms an essential element of your scientific training throughout this program. Many of your laboratory sessions are also designed to provide you with hands on experience with a wide range of contemporary research equipment encountered in today’s modern Chemical and Biomolecular science research facilities.
In this program, you will learn to effectively communicate Chemical and Biomolecular science concepts and scientific results in various forms (written, oral, poster presentation) to a wide range of people, including your peers and the wider scientific community. Most activities will require you to present on your own or as a group and you will receive feedback on it.

Geology
Students are encouraged throughout this program to acquire the relevant subject skills, methods, knowledge and understanding through a variety of independent and collaborative activities. Primarily students attend a series of lectures and closely integrated practical classes that over the length of the program build up their basic knowledge of the discipline. Towards the middle and the end of the program students learn how to acquire data in both the field and laboratory, how to analyse and interpret data in order to produce scientific reports. Students also produce scientific assignments in the form of literature research projects which amplify aspects of their core skills. Towards the end of the program, students gain skills in communicating their results through presentations, in addition to critically assessing the works of others and communicating those results to their colleagues. The program is structured to promote and steadily encourage independent learning.

Geophysics
Students are encouraged throughout this program to acquire the relevant subject skills, methods, knowledge and understanding through a variety of independent and collaborative activities. Primarily students will attend a series of lectures and closely related practical classes that over the length of the program build up their basic knowledge of the discipline. Towards the middle and the end of the program students will learn how to acquire data in the field, how to analyse data and how to interpret data and produce scientific reports. Towards the end of the program, students will gain skills in communicating their results, as well as being able to understand the works of others and communicate those results to their colleagues. The program is structured to promote and steadily encourage independent learning.

Mathematics
Most mathematics units use lectures and tutorials (or practicals) as the main formal learning and teaching activities. Students are expected to read text books and other material to enhance their understanding, and to develop their understanding and skills through applying their newly acquired techniques and understanding to a wide range of exercises outside of the formal teaching times.

• Lectures are where ideas, techniques and theory are introduced, and illustrated by a range of well chosen, illustrative examples.
• Tutorials provide a context in which students are actively involved in applying the ideas and techniques introduced in lectures. Tutorials typically involve a mixture of individual and group work, with guidance and assistance from the tutor. Students also have opportunities to develop and practice their skills at explaining and presenting mathematical arguments and ideas.
• Practicals are often a feature of early mathematics units; providing opportunities to explore a greater range of examples and to engage with the process of understanding how to approach the task of developing strategies to approach mathematical problems and developing the required insight to select appropriate mathematical techniques. Practicals typically involve an interactive discussion between a faculty member and students to develop solutions to questions related to material recently introduced in lectures.

The three special units in this program, MATH188, MATH288 and MATH388 involve close collaboration between students and faculty members, with a mixture of formal lectures, individual research and reading and extended projects. Students in this program also have the opportunity to work on summer research programs with faculty members through the department's vacation scholarship program.

Palaeobiology
The fundamental tenets that underpin the teaching philosophy behind the Palaeobiology Major are to equip each student with the knowledge, technical skills, professionalism and confidence to gain employment and research capacity to succeed in their chosen field of endeavour. To achieve this, the specific aims of the major are to:
• to introduce each student to the broad sweep of the history of life on Earth by focusing on the functional morphology, evolution and extinction, palaeoecology, biostratigraphy, and palaeobiogeography of the most important and informative invertebrate and vertebrate fossil groups,
• provide an introduction to some of the applied aspects of life, earth and marine sciences, using relevant examples from current or recent research investigations,
• provide first-hand experience of fossil material in the lab and field using cutting edge quantitative and qualitative scientific methods and techniques,
• enthuse and encourage students to undertake independent critical scientific thought by using a combination of generic and specialists skills required by all scientists and how to think and express themselves “scientifically”.

The Palaeobiology Major is taught by academics with expertise in the research and teaching of palaeobiology (the history of life), palaeoecology, marine science and quantitative palaeobiology. All students undertaking the major gain broad experience and knowledge in each subject, and are exposed to innovative problem-based learning techniques, group-based work, a mixture of seminars and poster presentations, online workshops and written assignment work based on synthesis and critical evaluation directly from the primary scientific literature.

The Major has been designed so that all students gain broad experience and knowledge in each unit and are exposed to a wide variety of teaching techniques. All units are available online and are offered on campus or by Distance Education (external study) on an annual basis. Most units have a fieldwork component ranging from weekend excursions to eight-day intensive programs. All units incorporate significant proportions of research material in the form of case studies, workshops, and field programs.

The units in the Palaeobiology Major provide a carefully planned pathway designed to include a mix of field-based learning, supplemented by relevant lectures and lab sessions with high quality specimens/materials that challenge each student to solve specific problems. Field based units at 300 level allows students to complete Independent Group Projects (IGPs) which are designed to challenge small groups of students to design, formulate, collect/observe/measure data in the field and/or lab and produce a logically organised written scientific report. This is perfect initial training for advanced undergraduates who might consider completing an MRes degree in the future. The structure of the major combines theoretical and practical aspects, building competency in both discipline specific skills and knowledge, and in graduate capabilities, such as problem-solving and communication skills.

At first year level, students are introduced to the scientific method, at second year level students build their knowledge base in evolutionary and ecological principles, taxonomy of the major groups and palaeobiological techniques and applications that provide opportunities to delve into the cutting edge research streams in the discipline. At third year level, students design and test their own simple scientific research questions under staff guidance and develop and test more complex (often interdisciplinary) research questions.

All units are offered using flexible delivery utilizing a diversity of media (e.g. videos, lectures, readings, activities). Our teaching methods also aim to help students to develop “soft skills”, by enhancing communication, tolerance and interpersonal relationships as well as encouraging discussion, debate and synthesis of available data. The students thus work in an environment (lab or field) that replicates how a team of scientists might interact in the workplace, whether private industry, government agencies or academia.

The BAdvSci degree has one of the highest ATARs for a science program in Australia. On top if the specialized PalaeoMajor, students will complete special advanced units only available to other students inthis degree. Student numbers are restricted, allowing personal attention including an academic mentor throughout the degree and direct contact with researchers. Students have the opportunity to take part in research and gain practical experience in research laboratories and research groups.

Physics
Refer to the Astronomy and Astrophysics major above.

In addition to the learning and teaching methods used in the Bachelor of Physics degree, the Bachelor of Advanced Science Physics degree involves three additional courses, one per year, that provide in depth coverage of fundamental concepts in physics. These concepts include but are not limited to: Classical Mechanics using Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, the role of symmetry and conservation laws in nature, classical field theory, probability theory, and stochastic processes.

Software Technology
The Major in Software Technology is designed to prepare graduates as IT professionals for work in industry, research organisations and academia. The program is intended to meet the Australian Computer Society professional standards for ICT courses which includes the underlying core body of knowledge in IT and the professional and ethical responsibilities relevant to working in the IT industry.

In addition, this program in the Bachelor of Advanced Science offers students two special units in first and third year that involve them directly in the research activities of the Department. These offer a chance to interact with Computing academics and carry out a small research project.

The learning activities in the degree are designed to provide opportunities for students to meet all of these standards. The academics involved with this program are active researchers, which enables them to integrate cutting-edge research into the units that they teach. The majority of the units in this program have practical components supported by small-group teaching sessions in our computing laboratories. Some units utilise small groups where students work in a team to achieve a goal. Communication skills are developed through oral presentations.

The theoretical components of units are presented in lectures and develop the underlying theory, in addition to developing analytical and problem solving skills. All units have weekly face-to-face activities. Assignments are used for formative and summative purposes. As knowledge in IT is continually evolving, learning and teaching methods support the capacity for students to become independent learners.

The major culminates with a Capstone unit that involves students being part of a small team assigned to an industry partner to carry out an industry relevant project. Students work autonomously under the guidance of academic staff and using industry staff as 'clients'. The project allows students to apply in an integrated manner the knowledge and skills they have developed in their studies on a substantial design, analysis or development problem.

Statistics
In the core statistics major, lectures and tutorials (or practicals) are the main learning and teaching activities. Students are expected to spend extra time in self study to improve their understanding of the content of their units.
Lectures: where usually the theory is introduced and if possible collaborative discussion and active learning exercises are used to improve student engagement with the content of the lectures.
Tutorials: where usually theories are put into application either within computer laboratories or small tutorial groups. Students are encouraged to work together to enable peer learning.
Practicals: similar to the tutorials where theories are put into application by the help of tutors/demonstrators. Students are encouraged to work together to enable peer learning.
Self study: with extra learning materials, students are expected to enhance their learning in many of the statistics major units.
In addition to the core learning methods from the standard Statistics major, student in the Advanced award will study specialist statistical units. These units incorporate a mixture of traditional learning and teaching activities with individual research and projects in collaboration with other more experienced postgraduate students and academic members of the Statistics department.
Assessment Astronomy and Astrophysics
Assessment tasks are intended both to measure individual progress and give feedback. They are based on the topics of the units of study and are provided in two forms: whilst you are working on a task and once you have completed a task. Both forms of feedback are important as they provide you with information and guidance on your development and progress.
At least three different assessment methods are used in each unit. They include problem solving, laboratory work and reports, oral presentations, essays, active participation in lectures and/or tutorials, online and in-class quizzes, individual and group projects. Formal examinations are part of the assessment of the majority of units and involve solving of problems appropriate for the scope and level of the unit.
The assessment in most physics and astronomy units includes regular assessment tasks, such as the submission of weekly/biweekly home assignments and/or in-class tests, designed to assist you in your learning development. Standards and criteria for coursework, what is assessed and how it is assessed, are contained in each unit guide or may be made available during classes. Assessment is undertaken by academic staff, demonstrators and tutors. In some cases peer assessment will contribute to the grade, and it may be done by people from outside the university, such as work placement supervisors or guest lecturers.
Where group work is involved, a self-reflection and peer assessment/feedback in the form of contribution to the assessment task is incorporated into the requirements of the assessment so that your individual contribution can be identified.

Biology
There are multiple assessment tasks which emphasises the many skills the students are expected to gain during the degree. The first is engagement with the discussions during the weekly tutorials. The pre-reading provided means that students must be able to synthesis what they have read and then actively engage in discussion with an expert in the field and their peers. Secondly the students' oral presentations are assessed by their peers and the Director during the annual Advanced Biology conference. They must also provide a written report, often in the form of a scientific paper, of their internship experience or write a review of a hot topic in biology. Their internships are assessed by the host whom provides feedback on all aspects of the internship (ranging from practical lab skills to social skills). Collectively assessment is very rounded and compliments the assessment tasks they receive during the rest of their biology degrees. These assessments are in addition to those in the general biology degree (below).
Assessments in Biology are designed not only to test students' discipline-specific knowledge and skills but also their ability to integrate and analyse information to solve real-world problems. Assessments are spread throughout semester to enable students to build confidence and gain feedback as they learn.
In recognition that students learn and communicate in different ways, assessment methods are diverse, with at least three different types of assessment in every unit. Assessment methods include, but are not limited to, exams and quizzes, written assessments (such as scientific reports, grant proposals, critical essays and journals of learning), oral assessments (such as presentations, debates and discussions), and multi-media presentations (posters, videos, blogs).
In addition to formal assessments, students are provided with regular informal feedback on their progress. This is done through activities that involve self- and peer-evaluation, as well as through our strong student support system of tutors and academic advisors.

Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences
Assessment is made on the submission of individual and group coursework. In some units, a small component of the assessment is made from observations of student participation in laboratory or tutorial environments. Assessment types are diverse across units and may include written assessments (such as scientific reports, essays, project proposals, case studies, critique of the scientific literature) or oral assessments (such as seminars, debates, discussions) or multimedia presentations (such as scientific poster presentations, digital media presentations, blogs, wikis).
Most units have a final examination which forms a significant part of the assessment of student
achievement, and which is where a student's ability to apply knowledge is assessed. All units have at least three different types of assessment.
Clear standards and criteria for coursework, what is assessed and how it is assessed, are contained in each unit guide. The program incorporates formative and summative feedback. Formative feedback is that which is received whilst you are working on a task. Summative feedback is that received once you have completed a task. Both forms of feedback are extremely important and provide you with information and guidance on your development and progress. Feedback is mostly provided in written form and occasionally in discussion with peers, tutors and academic advisors.

Geology
The assessment methods are mostly based on the submission of individual coursework. This can range from undertaking numerical and descriptive assignments; to oral presentations; to the production of scientific reports; and to the examination of learnt knowledge in quizzes and exams.
The program incorporates formative and summative feedback. Formative feedback is that which is received whilst students are working on a task, often during "hands on" practical sessions or fieldwork. Summative feedback is that received once students have completed a task. Both forms of feedback are extremely important and provide students with information and guidance on their development and progress. Feedback may be provided in written form or simply in discussion with peers and teachers.
One important aspect of the program is the emphasis on students communicating their own findings as well as understanding and dissecting the work of others. This comes to the fore in the later part of the program where students give presentations and produce reports on the works of others and themselves.
Toward the end of the program there is one substantial assessment event that requires students to integrate and exhibit their skills, knowledge and application. This event involves the production of several large field maps by students working in groups, who then interpret that data and to produce an individual scientific report and geological interpretation.

Geophysics
The assessment methods are mostly based on the submission of individual coursework. This can range from undertaking numerical and descriptive assignments; to oral presentations; to the production of scientific reports; and to the examination of learnt knowledge.
The program incorporates formative and summative feedback. Formative feedback is that which is received whilst students are working on a task. Summative feedback is that received once students have completed a task. Both forms of feedback are extremely important and provide students with information and guidance on their development and progress. Feedback may be provided in written form or simply in discussion with peers and teachers.
One important aspect of the program is the emphasis on students communicating their own findings as well as understanding and dissecting the work of others. This comes to the fore in the later part of the program where students give presentations and produce reports on the works of others and themselves.
Toward the end of the program there is one substantial assessment event that requires students to integrate and exhibit their skills, knowledge and application. This event involves the acquisition of a large data-set by students, who then interpret that data and produce a scientific report.

Mathematics
Various assessment methods are used in the units that constitute the mathematics major. These includes problem solving, producing reports, oral presentations, active participation in lectures and/or tutorials, online quizzes, individual and group projects and formal examinations.
Where group work is involved, a self reflection and peer assessment/feedback form on contribution of each student to the assessment task is incorporated into the requirements of the assessment so that individual contribution of each student can be identified.
The assessment in most mathematics units includes a number of regular low-stakes formative assessment tasks, such as the submission of weekly tutorial exercises, designed to assist students in their learning development; in addition to a range of summative assessment tasks.

Palaeobiology
All assessment tasks in each of the core palaeobiology units are designed to test capacity and competency in discipline-specific knowledge and skills. Assessments are normally spread throughout semester to enable students to build confidence and gain feedback as they learn.
Because the structure of the units is diverse, ranging from traditional weekly Lecture/Lab sessions to intensive blocks of learning at on-campus sessions or in the field (sometimes in remote locations), assessment strategies are spread across a wide spectrum. All units have at least 3 different types of assessment and these might include, but are not limited to: exams and online quizzes, written assessments (such as scientific evaluations, critical essays and comment and reply tasks), oral assessments (such as presentations, debates and discussion topics), peer review tasks, and multi-media presentations (posters, videos, blogs).
Advanced Science students also attend weekly reserach focussed seminars and discussions with Academic and Research Staff, conduct a literature-based research project and produce a scientific based on Lab or vacation research projects.

Physics
Refer to the Astronomy and Astrophysics major above.
In addition to the assessment methods used for the degree Bachelor of Physics, the Bachelor of Advanced Science Physics degree includes additional coursework that includes assessments based on homework assignments, individual projects, and final exams. For the three additional advanced physics courses (Phys188, Phys246, and Phys388) the students are asked to complete an individual research project (typically one per semester). This project involves preparing a 10-15 page report on a specific topic within the theme of the course. The report includes: motivation and background, derivation of important results, figures and data if relevant, discussion, conclusions, and references. The students also give a 20-30 minute oral presentation of their results at the end of the semester and are expected to comment on their peer's presentations.

Software Technology
Units in the Major in Software Technology all have at least three different types of assessment. These assessments are designed not just to test discipline-specific knowledge, but all aspects of professional competency include professional practice, project work, design and communication skills. In addition to formal assessments, students are provided with informal feedback from staff and their peers throughout the semester.
Assessment types are very diverse and include:
o assignments - test the understanding of a learning outcome by means of small size problems
o programming assignments - allow students to demonstrate their competency in developing software of varying complexity
o reports and documents - beside essay style questions to analyse and critique different topics they also assess relevant skills involving documentation such as requirements documentation and project plans
o oral presentations - these test students ability to communicate the results of their work
o group reports - are used when group projects or group laboratory work is conducted
o final exams - the majority of the units will have a final examination where the ability to synthesize and apply knowledge is assessed
o quizzes and in-class tests assess student learning part-way through the unit and provide feedback to students on learning progress
o tutorial assessment - assess students work in formal tutorial sessions where students receive the support of tutors and other staff.

Statistics
Various assessment methods are used in the required units for the Bachelor of Advanced Science Statistics degree. As for the Bachelor of Science Statistics, the assessment includes problem solving, producing short or full statistical reports, oral presentations, active participation in lectures and/or tutorials, online quizzes, application of statistical methods. Additionally students of the Bachelor of Advanced Science Statistics degree will be involved in group research projects with students from later years and staff. They will be evaluated on their ability to contribute to their working group, demonstrating that they can work independently on parts of the projects and present the results, in written and oral form.
Recognition of Prior Learning

Macquarie University may recognise prior formal, informal and non-formal learning for the purpose of granting credit towards, or admission into, a program. The recognition of these forms of learning is enabled by the University’s Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Policy (see www.mq.edu.au/policy) and its associated Procedures and Guidelines. The RPL pages contain information on how to apply, links to registers, and the approval processes for recognising prior learning for entry or credit.


Information can be found at: https://mq.edu.au/rpl

Support for Learning

Macquarie University aspires to be an inclusive and supportive community of learners where all students are given the opportunity to meet their academic and personal goals. The University offers a comprehensive range of free and accessible student support services which include academic advice, counselling and psychological services, advocacy services and welfare advice, careers and employment, disability services and academic skills workshops amongst others. There is also a bulk billing medical service located on campus.

Further information can be found at www.students.mq.edu.au/support/

Campus Wellbeing contact details:
Phone: +61 2 9850 7497
Email: campuswellbeing@mq.edu.au
www.students.mq.edu.au/support/wellbeing

Program Standards and Quality

The program is subject to an ongoing comprehensive process of quality review in accordance with a pre-determined schedule that complies with the Higher Education Standards Framework. The review is overseen by Macquarie University's peak academic governance body, the Academic Senate and takes into account feedback received from students, staff and external stakeholders.

Graduate Destinations and Employability Physics and Astronomy and Astrophysics
Successful completion of a degree in Physics and Astronomy is a demonstration of capacity to observe, analyse and interpret complex situations, and to solve a wide range of problems. The graduates may pursue a career in physical sciences in academia (after post-graduate studies) or industry (often after post-graduate studies). Varieties of specialized fields of physics find their application in electro-optics, telecom, mining, semiconductor, aerospace, biomedical industries and national defence.

Outside the immediate field of studies the graduates [in combination with other professional studies/training] are employed in secondary school teaching, law (particularly patent law), finance, data analysis and applications, public policy development, medical physics and imaging.

Biology
The focus of our major on the development problem-solving and critical-thinking skills enables graduates of the biology major to enter a diversity of fields. these include:
• animal keeper
• aquarist
• biotechnologist
• captive breeder
• education officer
• ecological consultant
• environmental officer
• food industry quality control
• genetic counsellor
• greenhouse/garden curator
• land manager
• natural resource manager
• ranger
• research technician
• scientific researcher
• science teacher
• statistical analyst
• quarantine inspector
• wildlife manager.

Major employers include:
• environmental consulting firms
• local, state and federal government agencies
• universities and research institutes
• pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.
In the third year of study, we prepare students for the job market by helping them to formulate their skills and experiences into a CV, and with mock job interviews.

Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences
A major in Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences offers a path into a wide range of job options in many industries including those engaged in manufacturing, mining, pharmaceuticals, analytical services, medical research, diagnostics and biotechnology. It allows you to pursue a career in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry, research and educational institutions including Universities, and government agencies and laboratories. It provides an excellent foundation for postgraduate studies including medicine.
A major in Chemical and Biomolecular Sciences can also be combined with a range of related disciplines including biological sciences, medical sciences, geosciences, physics, business and law. These combinations also allow you to pursue a range of careers in business, industry, research and academia, both in Australia and internationally. Career options include biomedical sciences, advanced product manufacturing, biotechnology, drug discovery, patent law, analytical sciences, pharmaceuticals, research, sales and marketing and teaching.

Geology
Graduates are well prepared to work in the minerals and petroleum industries as they will be equipped with the fundamental Earth Science knowledge and problem solving skills required in the private sector. Likewise they are well prepared to work in state and national geological surveys and CSIRO as geologists, or undertake research careers in earth and planetary sciences in terms of their specific skill sets.

Geophysics
Students are able to work in the following areas:
o exploration and resource industries
o government research organisations and universities
o environmental and engineering companies.

Mathematics
Graduates from the Bachelor of Advanced Science - Mathematics are highly sought after in many sectors including aerospace and defence, engineering, finance and economics, IT and computing, insurance, environment, exploration geophysics and mining, meteorology, telecoms and utilities, education and academic research.

These areas of employment depend, at some point on handling and interpreting data, on modelling and predicting outcomes, and rely on the sort of complex quantitative problem-solving skills and more fundamental logical and analytical skills offered by graduates in mathematics.

The unique opportunities to study advanced topics and engage with current research provided throughout this program provide an unusually strong foundation for further study and research in mathematics, with many of our graduates proceeding to Doctoral studies, either at Macquarie or at one of a wide range of leading international institutions.

Palaeobiology
The focus of palaeobiology major is to provide career-specific skills and information, research training the development problem-solving and critical-thinking skills to enables graduate to enter a diversity of fields. Major employers include:
• state and regional museums
• universities and research institutes
• state/federal government geological surveys
• local, state and federal government agencies
• specialist geoscience consultancies universities
• geological surveys
• government utilities
• mining and resource exploration companies
• geothermal exploration industry
• specialist contractors
• national parks and wildlife
• environmental agencies
• research organisations
• secondary schools
• environmental consulting firms.

Software Technology
The Bachelor of Advanced Science - Software Technology prepares students for careers in a variety of Information Technology areas that involve analysis, development, deployment and maintenance of software systems. Some relevant careers include: software developer, business consultant and analyst, project leader, researcher, and systems administrator. Graduates in these and other areas of Information Technology are in high demand in the Australian workforce and Macquarie IT graduates are no exception (source: Good Universities Guide).
The capstone project unit provides experience in a team environment to approximate professional conditions.

Statistics
Statistics has been described as the science of making conclusions in the presence of uncertainty. Despite the affinity of statistics with real situations, it has a strong mathematical foundation. Careers can be found in business, government and defence organisations and graduates are in high demand all over the world. Statistics is a very pragmatic field, investigating real problems in the practical world. It has applications in:
Agriculture;
Bioinformatics;
Biology (biostatistics or biometrics);
Climatology;
Computing or computer science (statistical computing is a highly sought-after skill);
Ecology;
Economics (econometrics);
Finance (financial statistics);
Marketing;
Psychology (psychometrics);
Physics (statistical physics is a modern discipline in physics);
Genetics;
Clinical Trials;
Epidemiology;
Pharmacology;
Law;
National Defense
Assessment Regulations

This program is subject to Macquarie University regulations, including but not limited to those specified in the Assessment Policy, Academic Honesty Policy, the Final Examination Policy and relevant University Rules. For all approved University policies, procedures, guidelines and schedules visit www.mq.edu.au/policy.

Accreditation This is an Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) accredited qualification.

The Bachelor of Advanced Science - Astronomy and Astrophysics has an Australian Institute of Physics accreditation - every 5 years (most recently October 2013).

The Bachelor of Advanced Science - Mathematics is accredited by the Australian Mathematical Society. Review for renewal of accreditation is scheduled for 2014.

Inherent requirements are the essential components of a course or program necessary for a student to successfully achieve the core learning outcomes of a course or program. Students must meet the inherent requirements to complete their Macquarie University course or program.

Inherent requirements for Macquarie University programs fall under the following categories:

Physical: The physical inherent requirement is to have the physical capabilities to safely and effectively perform the activities necessary to undertake the learning activities and achieve the learning outcomes of an award.

Cognition: The inherent requirement for cognition is possessing the intellectual, conceptual, integrative and quantitative capabilities to undertake the learning activities and achieve the learning outcomes of an award.

Communication: The inherent requirement for communication is the capacity to communicate information, thoughts and ideas through a variety of mediums and with a range of audiences.

Behavioural: The behavioural inherent requirement is the capacity to sustain appropriate behaviour over the duration of units of study to engage in activities necessary to undertake the learning activities and achieve the learning outcomes of an award.

For more information see https://students.mq.edu.au/study/my-study-program/inherent-requirements



2019 Unit Information

When offered:
S1 Day
Prerequisites:
Permission of Executive Dean of Faculty
Corequisites:
None
NCCWs:
HSC Chinese, CHN113, CHN148